Robotic Hand

anatomy + robotics + prothetic limb.

 

Studies of anatomy, robotics, and a thesis in prothetic limbs resulted in the interest of recreating of the hand and it's mechanical movement. Through anatomical studies from different textbooks and visits to cadaver labs, drawings were made dissecting the flexers and extenders, and mockups were made of articulating hand movement through 3D printing. Programming motors and sensors with Arduino allowed iterations of different robotic movements to show a specific output. The final model uses three buttons to control the motors, which are each hooked up to certain fingers.

Related Projects: Prototyping Anatomy and Anatomical Studies       
 
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above

The final model uses fishing line to mimic extenders and flexors. Servo motors control the "contraction" movements of the fingers. Each motor is connected to a button that the user can press at their own interest, experiencing the resulting movement.

left

The left hand video shows an early prototype where a proximity sensor was used to stimulate the "contraction" movement created by the motors.

 

 

Prototyping Anatomy

 

This project is about how human anatomy can be recreated in physical models. Several of these studies resulted in wooden prototypes that show the extents of bio-mechanical movement of the arm and hand. Driven by numerous anatomy courses, visits to cadaver labs, and understanding the anatomical components of the arm and hands, 3D printed prototypes advanced the mechanical capabilities to show specific life-like movement of the hand. 

Related Projects: Robotic Hand and Anatomical Studies       
 
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Wooden Models

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Initial models were made out of wood for a rapid iteration process. Joints were cut using a mortise cutter. Modules help extend or shorten the length of limb. 

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3d printed models

Hook Grip: by pulling the red or blue string, the fingers are able to curl, showing flexion, or straighten, showing extension.    

Hook Grip: by pulling the red or blue string, the fingers are able to curl, showing flexion, or straighten, showing extension.

 

Utilizing Rhino for 3D modeling, these prototypes were quickly iterated to discover successful qualities of life like movement. The Hook Grip was best understood with stimulus to the extenders or flexors, shown by red or blue string.

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The image  above  uses laser cut gears and colored string to create pulleys for controlling extension or flexion.     The image  left  is a 3D printed iteration of the hook grip, resembling a tentacle.

The image above uses laser cut gears and colored string to create pulleys for controlling extension or flexion. 

The image left is a 3D printed iteration of the hook grip, resembling a tentacle.

 

Anatomical Studies

 

These drawings were created while learning the skeletal and muscular systems of the body. Lessons included visits to cadaver labs, anatomy textbooks, and nude drawing sessions. Each study requires a live model drawn in position, and a rendering of the bones and muscles involved in that position. 

Related Projects: Robotic Hand and Prototyping Anatomy
 
 
 

Evolution of Man Chess Set

Award Winning Chess Set in the 2014 Niche Awards

 

This chess set was hand made and entered into the 2014 Niche Awards. Each piece is hand carved out of Black Walnut and Hard Maple, accented with Black Walnut veneer and Birds Eye Maple veneer for the board. The inspiration for this piece came from the simple form of a tear shape, represented as the pawn. From there, each piece evolves from that form to show the progression of function within the game and through an old world history that has influenced the game. This project won first place in the student wood category.   

 
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Iron Casting

 

The Bell and The Tea Pot

Designing product for casting takes more than just a good drawing. These projects went through the entire process of design, to production, to the finished product.

This bell was cast out of ductile iron for its resonant quality. Its construction in three pieces allow for dissemble and reassembled. After casting, the pieces went through further machining and polishing by hand.    

 
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Work in progress: Cast Iron Tea Pot

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Inspired by a pentagon

Tea pots are culturally relevant to iron casting because of iron's ability to retain heat. This teapot was inspired by a pentagon and built out in bristol paper models. To cast this piece, a final sized model was made out of ash wood for the pattern board.

 

Production Process

A pattern board is what creates a two-part sand mold, which needs strength to endure a hydro-press. To make the cavity, a core box was made by vacuum forming over the wooden model and lining plastic with 1/4" ply wood, making an even wall thickness. After casting, the tea pot was cleaned, polished, and hammered to texture the surface. 

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Triangle Table

 

This table was influenced by optical illusions. Curious about creating a floating table top, stretchers are mortise-and-tenoned into the legs at specific angles to support the inner triangles. Each angle and joint was created by hand, and made out of Black Walnut Wood.

 
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Triangle Table

Drawing created with AutoCAD. 

 

 

Metal Machining Pendant

Inspired by the process of machining techniques, this pendant was created to show two different machining processes dictated by each machine used: a metal lathe, which creates round objects; and a J-head milling machine (Bridgeport), which references x,y,z axis coordinates to create geometry. The base geometry of this pendant utilized aluminum hexagonal stock, and was polished by hand with emory boards and burnishers.

 
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bridgeport

The Bridgeport was set up with an indexing head that allowed me to angle the stock at 30 degrees while rotating every 60 degrees to create 6 facets. 

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Lathe

Using a radius cutter on the lathe, one side was shaped into a hemisphere. The process of rounding hexagonal stock created beautiful arches on this domed half of the pendant.